Friday, January 27, 2023

Marketing-Focused Esports Deals - Gambling Site M88 Mansion Partners with Vietnamese Esports Team (TrendHunter.com)
Marketing-Focused Esports Deals - Gambling Site M88 Mansion Partners with Vietnamese Esports Team (TrendHunter.com) (TrendHunter.com) Asian betting company M88 Mansion has partnered with 335CauGiay (335CG), a Vietnamese esports organization known for its competitive CS:GO roster. The partnership will focus on bolstering 335CG’s...
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Fixed-Rate Pizza Commitments - Pizza Pizza Keeps the $16.99 XL 4-Topping Pizza at a Fixed Price (TrendHunter.com)
Fixed-Rate Pizza Commitments - Pizza Pizza Keeps the $16.99 XL 4-Topping Pizza at a Fixed Price (TrendHunter.com) (TrendHunter.com) Pizza Pizza, a Canadian quick-serve chain, is extending its Fixed-Rate Pizza offer, where customers can purchase a $16.99 XL 4-topping pizza at a fixed price for at least a year until the end of 2023....
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Intel Confirms Meteor Lake CPU Ramp In 2H 2023, Lunar Lake In 2024 For Client, Emerald Rapids In 2H 2023 & Granite Rapids In 2024 For Server
Intel Confirms Meteor Lake CPU Ramp In 2H 2023, Lunar Lake In 2024 For Client, Emerald Rapids In 2H 2023 & Granite Rapids In 2024 For Server

Yesterday, Intel posted its most disastrous quarter in recent times with all major segments reporting losses but the company also reaffirmed that these results won't affect its internal execution and roadmap plans for next-gen client and server CPUs.

Intel Meteor Lake & Lunar Lake CPUs Aim 2H 2023 & 2024 Ramp For Client, Emerald Rapids & Granite Rapids Aim 2023 & 2024 Launch, Respectively

Intel has a lot of work to do to get back into the game and that's where all the new and upcoming products come in. According to Intel, the company is prepared to begin production of its Meteor Lake CPUs based on the Intel 4 process node today while a full-on ramp is expected in the second half of 2023. Intel states that both Intel 4 and Intel 3 process nodes are looking good and on track to become their first EUV-powered designs for the CCG and DCG.

Rebuilding the culture has begun to show benefits in manufacturing and design. Our progress against our TD (Technology Development Group) roadmap continued to improve throughout CY22, and every quarter our confidence grows. We are at or ahead of our goal of five nodes in four years. Intel 7 is now in high-volume manufacturing for both client and server. On Intel 4, we are ready today for manufacturing and we look forward to the MTL (Meteor Lake) ramp in the second half of the year.

Intel 3 continues to show great health and is on track. Intel 4 and 3 are our first nodes deploying EUV (extreme ultraviolet lithography) and will represent a major step forward in terms of transistor performance per watt and density. On Intel 20A and Intel 18A, the first nodes to benefit from RibbonFet and PowerVia, internal test chips, and those of a major potential foundry customer, have taped-out with silicon running in the fab. We continue to be on track to regain transistor performance and power performance leadership by 2025.

via Intel

Intel Aiming To Ship 1 Million Sapphire Rapids Xeon CPUs By Mid-2023

Starting with the first product release of 2023, we have Intel's Sapphire Rapids Xeon CPUs which were launched on the 10th of January and it looks like Intel has landed some major customer & partner wins that included Dell Technologies, Google Cloud, HPE, Lenovo, Microsoft Azure, NVIDIA and Amazon amongst several others. Chipzilla expects Sapphire Rapids to ship 1 Million units by the mid of 2023 and that would also mark a positive trend for DRAM makers as we recently told.

On the product front, the PRQ (product release qualification) of SPR (Sapphire Rapids) in Q3 and the formal introduction of our 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable CPU and Xeon CPU Max series, better known to many of you as SPR and SPR HBM (Sapphire Rapids with high bandwidth memory), respectively, on Jan 10 was a great milestone.

It was particularly satisfying to host a customer-centered event including testimonials from Dell, Google Cloud, HPE, Lenovo, Microsoft Azure, and NVIDIA, among others. We are thrilled to be ramping production to meet a strong backlog of demand and we are on track to ship 1 million units by mid-year. In addition, as part of AXG’s move into DCAI, it is noteworthy that our Intel Flex Series, optimized for and showing clear leadership in media stream density and visual quality, is now shipping initial deployments with large CSPs (communication service providers) and MNCs (multinational corporations), enabling large-scale cloud gaming and media delivery deployments.

via Intel

Intel Xeon Emerald Rapids Launch In 2H 2023, Granite Rapids On Track For 2024

Talking about future Xeon chips, Intel reaffirmed that its Emerald Rapids CPUs are sampling and they have completed the first power-on with top customers. The Emerald Rapids CPUs will be a refresh of sorts of the Sapphire Rapids lineup, acting as an intermediary between that and the Granite Rapids family. The CPUs are expected to launch in 2H 2023. The Granite Rapids CPUs are expected to launch in 2024 and are already running multiple operating systems & various configs at Intel's labs. The Sierra Forest CPUs featuring an all-E-Core design are also on track for a 2024 launch.

Our DCAI roadmap only improves from here. Emerald Rapids is sampling and has completed power-on with top OEM (original equipment manufacturer) and CSP customers, and it remains on track to launch in the second half of 2023. Granite Rapids, our next performance core addition to the Xeon portfolio is on-track to launch in 2024, running multiple operating systems across many different configurations.

Further, our first Efficient-core product, Sierra Forrest, is also on on-track for 2024. Lastly, it is appropriate to continue to highlight PSG for its stand-out performance, delivering record Q4 revenue, up 42% year-over-year. We are planning to have a more fulsome look at our progress in DCAI at our next investor webinar later in Q1 – stay tuned for the invitation.

via Intel

Intel Meteor Lake CPUs In 2H 2023, Lunar Lake In 2H 2024 For Client Core Family

Back to the client side of things, Intel's CCG will be working on two major products for 2023 and 2024. These include Meteor Lake which ramps up in 2H 2023 and Lunar Lake which ramps up in 2H 2024. Both CPU lineups are mobile first with Lunar Lake clearly labeled as being "optimized for ultra-low power performance". Do note that there's no mention of Arrow Lake but that's also going to launch sometime in 2024 with Lunar Lake more realistically being a 2025 product.

Meteor Lake, our first disaggregated CPU built on Intel 4, remains on track for the second half of the year. And with MTL progressing well, it’s now appropriate to look forward to Lunar Lake, which is on track for production readiness in 2024, having taped-out its first silicon. Lunar Lake is optimized for ultra-low power performance, which will enable more of our PC partners to create ultra-thin-and-light systems for mobile users.

In addition, as we outlined on our webinar, we are excited by the strength of the Evo  brand, the introduction of Unison for leadership multidevice experiences as we ramp the more than 60 design wins, and the uniqueness of vPro in the enterprise market, helping our customers drive an almost 200% return on investment by deploying vPro platforms to their end users. Lastly as consumer graphics re-integrates into CCG, enthusiasm for our latest Alchemist-based discrete graphics products continues to build and we expect volume ramp through the year.

via Intel

The quoted information comes from Intel's EVP & GM of CCG (Client Computing Group), Michelle Johnston Holthaus, who has stated that the Lunar Lake family will feature a fresh new architecture and a brand new design built from the ground up. The architecture will mainly focus on bringing some big performance per watt improvements in the mobile space & more information is expected to be unveiled at the Financial Day on the 26th of January when Chipzilla will disclose its Q4 results.

Last year, during a press-only HotChips presentation, Intel revealed that the Lunar Lake family is originally aimed at the 15W low-power mobile CPU segment. The CPU will utilize a sub-20A node as its process technology alongside an external foundry node for various other IPs since this will be a multi-tiled chip design. You can expect all the latest and greatest innovations from Intel such as Foveros packaging (25um pitch). Now saying that these chips are optimized for mobile doesn't necessarily mean that they won't launch on the desktop platform but with reports coming out that Intel might shift its Meteor Lake chips away from desktops and do an intermediate refresh of sorts on the platform, it may also not be too farfetched to believe so.

Rest assured, we remain committed to creating value for our owners and to delivering the long-term strategic roadmap we laid out at the beginning of this journey, and we are confident in our ability to do so. We will: (1) Deliver on five nodes in four years, achieving process performance parity in 2024 and unquestioned leadership by 2025 with Intel 18A; (2) execute on an aggressive SPR ramp, introduce EMR (Emerald Rapids) in the second half of 2023 and GNR (Granite Rapids) and SRF (Sierra Forest) in 2024; (3) ramp MTL in the second half of 2023 and PRQ LNL (Lunar Lake) in 2024; and (4) expand our IFS customer base to include large design wins on Intel 16, Intel3 and 18A this year.

via Intel

Pat Gelsinger also clarified that they are either on or ahead of schedule for their Angstorm era nodes that include 20A and 18A. They already have the first silicon in fab and will be going into the full production phase in a few years.

Intel Mainstream CPU Generations Comparison:

Intel CPU Family Processor Process Processor Architecture Processors Cores/Threads (Max) TDPs Platform Chipset Platform Memory Support PCIe Support Launch
Sandy Bridge (2nd Gen) 32nm Sandy Bridge 4/8 35-95W 6-Series LGA 1155 DDR3 PCIe Gen 2.0 2011
Ivy Bridge (3rd Gen) 22nm Ivy Bridge 4/8 35-77W 7-Series LGA 1155 DDR3 PCIe Gen 3.0 2012
Haswell (4th Gen) 22nm Haswell 4/8 35-84W 8-Series LGA 1150 DDR3 PCIe Gen 3.0 2013-2014
Broadwell (5th Gen) 14nm Broadwell 4/8 65-65W 9-Series LGA 1150 DDR3 PCIe Gen 3.0 2015
Skylake (6th Gen) 14nm Skylake 4/8 35-91W 100-Series LGA 1151 DDR4 PCIe Gen 3.0 2015
Kaby Lake (7th Gen) 14nm Skylake 4/8 35-91W 200-Series LGA 1151 DDR4 PCIe Gen 3.0 2017
Coffee Lake (8th Gen) 14nm Skylake 6/12 35-95W 300-Series LGA 1151 DDR4 PCIe Gen 3.0 2017
Coffee Lake (9th Gen) 14nm Skylake 8/16 35-95W 300-Series LGA 1151 DDR4 PCIe Gen 3.0 2018
Comet Lake (10th Gen) 14nm Skylake 10/20 35-125W 400-Series LGA 1200 DDR4 PCIe Gen 3.0 2020
Rocket Lake (11th Gen) 14nm Cypress Cove 8/16 35-125W 500-Series LGA 1200 DDR4 PCIe Gen 4.0 2021
Alder Lake (12th Gen) Intel 7 Golden Cove (P-Core)
Gracemont (E-Core)
16/24 35-125W 600 Series LGA 1700/1800 DDR5 / DDR4 PCIe Gen 5.0 2021
Raptor Lake (13th Gen) Intel 7 Raptor Cove (P-Core)
Gracemont (E-Core)
24/32 35-125W 700-Series LGA 1700/1800 DDR5 / DDR4 PCIe Gen 5.0 2022
Raptor Lake Refresh (TBA) Intel 7 Raptor Cove (P-Core)
Gracemont (E-Core)
24/32 35-125W 700-Series LGA 1700/1800 DDR5 / DDR4 PCIe Gen 5.0 2023
Meteor Lake (TBA) Intel 4 Redwood Cove (P-Core)
Crestmont (E-Core)
22/28 35-125W 800 Series? LGA 1851 DDR5 PCIe Gen 5.0 2024 (Cancelled)
Arrow Lake (TBA) Intel 20A Lion Cove (P-Core)
Skymont (E-Core)
24/32 TBA 900-Series? LGA 1851 DDR5 PCIe Gen 5.0 2024
Arrow Lake Refresh (TBA) Intel 20A Lion Cove (P-Core)
Skymont (E-Core)
TBA TBA TBA LGA 1851? DDR5 PCIe Gen 5.0 2025
Lunar Lake (TBA) Intel 18A TBD TBA TBA TBA TBA DDR5 PCIe Gen 5.0? 2025
Panther Lake (TBA) TBA TBD TBD TBD 1000-Series? LGA 1851? DDR5 PCIe Gen 6.0? 2026
Nova Lake (TBA) Intel 18A TBD TBA TBA 2000-Series? TBA DDR5? PCIe Gen 6.0? 2026

The post Intel Confirms Meteor Lake CPU Ramp In 2H 2023, Lunar Lake In 2024 For Client, Emerald Rapids In 2H 2023 & Granite Rapids In 2024 For Server by Hassan Mujtaba appeared first on Wccftech.

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Roman Numeral-Inspired Ketchup Ads - HEINZ Launches “LVII Meanz 57” in Time for The Big Game (TrendHunter.com)
Roman Numeral-Inspired Ketchup Ads - HEINZ Launches “LVII Meanz 57” in Time for The Big Game (TrendHunter.com) (TrendHunter.com) Heinz, a brand of ketchup, is launching a campaign called “LVII Meanz 57” ahead of this year's Super Bowl (which is also known as the Big Game) in order to encourage fans to drop...
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Intel Arc Alchemist “Fine Wine” GPU Drivers Reportedly On The Way, Major Performance Boost In Games
Intel Arc Alchemist “Fine Wine” GPU Drivers Reportedly On The Way, Major Performance Boost In Games

Intel Bundles $370 Worth Games & Apps With Intel Arc & Alder Lake Desktops & Laptops 1

Intel is reportedly working on a major GPU update that will boost the performance of Arc Alchemist GPUs in the upcoming drivers.

Intel insider information states that the company will see a significant update to its graphics card drivers, especially in older game titles using DirectX9

PC Games Hardware had focused heavily on Intel's Arc graphics card driver status over the last few months, especially with Intel running into several issues during the launch regarding software for the Arc GPUs. However, there appears to be a significantly important driver update from Intel that increased the overall performance in games utilizing the DirectX9 API. This was a discussion point by the company as they had reported that the optimizations for older titles would take much longer than games that use DirectX12 API and the open-source Vulkan API.

Since Intel ran into issues towards the initial run of the Arc GPUs, sales were stagnant compared to NVIDIA and AMD. This was mainly due to the latter two companies having more experience in the graphics card industry than Intel, which just started over the last year and a half. PC Games Hardware has heard from "well-informed sources," which are unknown if they are directly from Intel or some other organization, that there will soon be a significant update to the graphics driver from the company. Still, as far as the release date, nothing has been revealed.

[…] as we have heard from well-informed circles, Intel is currently preparing a major driver update that is intended to increase performance across the board – apparently one of the undoubtedly existing brakes has been identified and eliminated.

— PC Games Hardware, Raphael Voetter (translation)

Below is the current list of games collected by PC Games Hardware, complete with API compatibility, notes on the performance of each game, and if there is raytracing involved.

Image source: PC Games Hardware via VideoCardz.

Halo Infinite was the most affected by incompatibility, showing "severe streaming/texture/LOD issues." A few other titles have minor to medium-level issues, but this game compatibility list is encouraging for only a handful.

If it is true that Intel will receive a massive update to open more compatibility with older titles using DirectX9 and DirectX11/12, then Intel would stand better against the two major GPU powerhouses (AMD and NVIDIA) and could potentially outperform them in the future.

The post Intel Arc Alchemist “Fine Wine” GPU Drivers Reportedly On The Way, Major Performance Boost In Games by Jason R. Wilson appeared first on Wccftech.

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Thursday, January 26, 2023

DDU “Display Driver Uninstaller” Now Comes With A Installer & Uninstaller Package
DDU “Display Driver Uninstaller” Now Comes With A Installer & Uninstaller Package

DDU

The latest version of DDU or Display Driver Uninstaller has been released which comes with an installer/uninstaller package.

DDU "Display Driver Uninstaller" Version 18.0.6.0 Finally Comes With An Installer/Uninstaller Package That Was Missing In Previous Versions

Display Driver Uninstaller, also known as DDU, is recommended to be used if, when removing AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA graphics drivers since the standard removal process may become a bit corrupted, not allowing the user to remove the software files as needed.

After using the DDU tool, the system will remove NVIDIA and ATI drivers and allow for a fresh install as though you were installing onto a new Windows system. The company does state that when using a tool of this caliber, they recommend that the user prepares a system restore point before utilizing DDU in case any issues arise.

System Requirements:

.NET framework 4.8
Windows 7, 8, 8.1, 10, 11 (32/64 bits) (Insiders preview is at your own risk)

Special Note: It is strictly prohibited to distribute our software, Display Driver Uninstaller (DDU), by uploading it to any servers other than those authorized by Wagnardsoft.com.
However, individuals may copy and share the software with their personal contacts without any issues.
We kindly request that hosting the software on any third-party websites be refrained from.

ChangeLog:

  • New DDU installer.
  • Intel : Registry Power Settings CleanUP.
  • The moment that some DDU messages box appear make more sense now. Thanks to a user feedback.
  • There is a new button on the safe mode dialog window that allow to set Windows update search for drivers to default. Thanks to a user feedback.
  • Updated LICENSE
  • Translation : Swedish.xml

When starting to use the tool, Wagnardsoft mentions that users can use the uninstaller in Normal mode, but for the best use and most stable processing, the Safe mode option is highly recommended. Another helpful note from the company is to "exclude the DDU folder" when your system wants to use security software, as that can potentially cause an issue in the future or during use. The best aspect of this tool is that it does not require you to uninstall any of the drivers. It will take care of this process for you and potentially do it better than the various uninstall options given by the top three manufacturers.

For those users interested in downloading the Display Driver Uninstaller 18.0.6.0 from Wagnardsoft, you can head to the company's official website, where you can also download the guide to ensure safe removal from your system.

The post DDU “Display Driver Uninstaller” Now Comes With A Installer & Uninstaller Package by Jason R. Wilson appeared first on Wccftech.

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Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 43-inch & 144Hz UHD Display, First Flat Mini-LED Gaming Monitor
Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 43-inch & 144Hz UHD Display, First Flat Mini-LED Gaming Monitor

Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 43-inch Display, First Flat Mini-LED Gaming Monitor 1

Samsung announces the launch of the company's first Mini-LED flat gaming monitor, the Odyssey Neo G7, with shipments being sent out globally. The new gaming display is 43 inches, allowing gamer plenty of screen space to play their favorite games and also to offer a large amount of productivity space for workers and creatives.

Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 is the company's first Mini-LED Flat gaming monitor with tons of power

The new Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 offers a 4K screen resolution, with sizes peaking at 3840 x 2160, and is VESA HDR600 and HDR 10+ certified. With Samsung Electronics' expertise, the new Odyssey Neo G7 utilizes Quantum Matrix Technology, allowing for premium details and exact management of the screen's LEDs to offer the best in rich blacks, detail, color gamut, and accurate shadowing in gaming. The Matte Display supports the reduction of reflections onto the screen so that gamers remain less distracted during their favorite gaming experiences.

The gaming monitor market is only going to get bigger, and gamers are now seeking more out of their monitors. We are not just delivering better gaming experience — we are rebuilding new smart capabilities into our screens that give gamers an all-in-one place for technology and entertainment. Our innovations are enabling gamers everywhere to stay absorbed in their games with visual performance that enhances the intense emotional experiences.

— Hoon Chung, Executive Vice President of Visual Display Business, Samsung Electronics

The Odyssey Neo G7 keeps images smooth and fabulous with its 1ms response time and 144Hz refresh rate while supporting AMD's FreeSync Premium Pro support. Samsung's Odyssey Neo G7 supports DisplayPort and HDMI, as well as complete console support through an HDMI 2.1 port. Additionally, users can connect via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth from their phone to play their favorite games on the go with the new 43-inch screen space.

Image source: Samsung Electronics via VideoCardz.
Image source: Samsung Electronics via VideoCardz.
Image source: Samsung Electronics via VideoCardz.
Image source: Samsung Electronics via VideoCardz.
Image source: Samsung Electronics via VideoCardz.

Samsung enables users to customize and personalize their experiences by managing screen position and size and optimizing the refresh ratio to match the input game. Users can select between 20 to 43 inches using the Flex Move Screen mode to ensure that every gamer will play their best.

Additional features are Samsung's Game Bar tool to quickly change settings on the fly without having to exit their games, review their frames per second, and manage other essential features such as:

  • aspect ratio
  • high dynamic range (HDR)
  • variable refresh rate (VRR)
  • screen ratio
  • response time
  • Game Picture mode

Samsung's Gaming Hub is the company's all-in-one platform that partners with Microsoft Xbox and NVIDIA GeForce NOW cloud gaming services so that users can gain access to some of the top games with plenty of gaming power, low overhead, and higher-quality images. Amazon Prime Video, Netflix, and YouTube can also be accessed through the new display's Smart Hub portal so that users can take a break from gaming sessions and watch their favorite movies.

G70NC
Display Screen Size 43”
Flat/Curved Flat
Panel Type Quantum Mini-LED
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Picture Refresh Rate (Max) 144Hz
Brightness (Typical) 400 nit
HDR VESA Display HDR600

HDR10+ Gaming

Response Time 1ms MPRT
Viewing Angle 178/178
Gaming Feature VRR FreeSync Premium Pro
Smart Feature Yes Gaming Hub, Media Hub
Audio Speaker 20W x 2
Interface Video Ports 1x DisplayPort (1.4) / 2x HDMI(2.1)
USB Ports 2x USB 3.0 ports
Others 1x Ethernet LAN, WiFi5, Bluetooth 5.2
Design Lighting Yes (Core Sync)
Stand Tilt
Wall Mount VESA (200×200)

The post Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 43-inch & 144Hz UHD Display, First Flat Mini-LED Gaming Monitor by Jason R. Wilson appeared first on Wccftech.

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Automatic Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation Boosts Performance On AMD Zen 4 CPUs
Automatic Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation Boosts Performance On AMD Zen 4 CPUs

Image source: J. Wilson, Wccftech

AMD has waited for the go-ahead to upload the company's supported Zen 4 Automatic Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation, or Automatic IBRS since it was first announced during the launch of the new AMD Ryzen 7000 series processors. This feature shares similarities with Intel's Enhanced IBRS support and will now see inclusion in the merge window for Linux 6.3 kernel. The new IBRS from AMD is expected to offer performance improvements for the company's AMD Ryzen 7000 series and EPYC 9004 processors.

AMD releases the Automatic Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation to match the same security and Spectre V2 mitigations found in Intel's line of processors

AMD's Automatic IBRS functionality works in that it offers reduced Spectre V2 mitigations, unlike the company's previous technique, which used return trampolines, also called Retpolines. This new technique will replace the Retpoline occurrences that have been active as soon as the Linux 6.3 kernel goes live.

Michael Larabel, Linux analyst and Editor of the website Phoronix note that AMD mentioned the new Automatic IBRS rollout during its new architecture launch. Still, initiating the code into the kernel has taken several months. Larabel states that users may not see the integration until possibly the second half of this year. To remind users, Linux 6.3 is expected to launch next month.

There are seven patches to enable the Automatic IBRS, which involves eighty new lines of code and adjusting the current code with the new enablement. AMD's Genoa server CPU series will probably benefit from the latest Automatic IBRS due to managing the processor's overhead and maintaining a lower profile than before, especially in high-performance workloads.

There is very little info to go on right now, but with the minimal testing that Larabel could complete in the Linux ecosystem, he noticed a slight improvement. However, he did note that since AMD has yet to post any initial benchmark results showing the new implementation, it is hard to tell if we see enough of an increase or if we are seeing a slight decrease. Larabel did compare his numbers to previous tests, which is why the specialist ensures readers that a performance boost will be present for all Linux-based AMD users.

The post Automatic Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation Boosts Performance On AMD Zen 4 CPUs by Jason R. Wilson appeared first on Wccftech.

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Wednesday, January 25, 2023

Continuous Scroll And The GSC Void: Did The Launch Of Continuous Scroll In Google’s Desktop Search Results Impact Impressions And Clicks? [Study]
Continuous Scroll And The GSC Void: Did The Launch Of Continuous Scroll In Google’s Desktop Search Results Impact Impressions And Clicks? [Study]
Google continuous scroll study based on GSC data.

Google rolled out continuous scroll in the desktop search results for English queries in the United States on December 5, 2022. Continuous scroll enables users to seamlessly continue to page two and beyond without having to click a “next” button at the bottom of the results. This followed Google rolling out continuous scroll in the mobile results in October of 2021 (again, U.S-only for English queries).

Here is Google’s announcement about the rollout to desktop in early December (with a gif of continuous scroll in action):

After the rollout to desktop, many wondered how continuous scroll would impact the visibility of rankings that were beyond page one. For example, for sites with urls ranking on page two, and maybe even the top of page two, the ability for users to easily scroll to additional pages of search results should lead to more impressions, clicks, and conversions. That’s the idea anyway, and something I set out to analyze.

Before continuous scroll rolled out in the SERPs, ranking on page two and beyond meant your listings probably wouldn’t be seen much. Sure, some people would venture to page two and beyond, but most would stick on page one (and just refine their search if they couldn’t find what they needed after scanning the results). But with continuous scroll, users can easily move to the second page of results without having to click a button. The new results just show up as you approach the bottom of the initial set of results.

Analyzing Continuous Scroll in the U.S. Desktop Search Results:
Right after the rollout of continuous scroll on desktop, I published a post explaining how to analyze the change in impressions, clicks, and click through rate based on users being able to seamlessly view more listings in the search results. My tutorial explains how to use the GSC API and Analytics Edge in Excel to bulk export data from GSC, filter by desktop only from the United States, compare timeframes, and then filter by page two and three results. The resulting worksheets quickly provide the changes across metrics when comparing the timeframe before, and after, continuous scroll rolled out.

After publishing that post, I’ve been eagerly waiting for more data to build in order to dig into the reporting across sites. And that’s exactly what I did for a number of sites across verticals. I knew the sites would have a ton of data to analyze, and across verticals, so it should be easier to see differences based on continuous scroll rolling out in the desktop SERPs in the United States.

Below, I’ll cover the methodology I used, the data I analyzed, some interesting (and scary) findings about GSC data, and the impact, or lack thereof, of continuous scroll rolling out in the desktop search results. Let’s jump in.

Methodology:
First, I selected twelve different sites that have a steady and significant amount of traffic from Google organic. Some of the properties are large-scale sites driving a lot of clicks from Google organic, where others were niche sites driving less traffic (but still a good amount of clicks). I made sure the sites were across verticals, and that those verticals weren’t heavily impacted by the holidays (as much as I could). Also, I made sure to focus on just the desktop results from the United States, since continuous scroll did not roll out internationally yet.

Then I used the process I mapped out in my tutorial for analyzing the change in metrics based on exporting data from GSC in bulk, filtering by desktop only from the U.S., comparing timeframes, and then filtering by page two and three results. You can check my tutorial for how to accomplish this using the GSC API, Excel, and Analytics Edge.

When analyzing the data, I made sure to review queries where the average position was about the same before and after continuous scroll rolled out. For example, I wouldn’t review a query that was ranking 24 before the update and then 16 after. That’s a big difference and could obviously impact the data. I looked for queries where the site ranked at about the same position so I could better analyze if continuous scroll was having an impact on visibility and engagement.

Regarding Google organic search traffic for the twelve sites, I have provided the number of clicks over the past three months for each of the sites I analyzed (just so you have a feel for how much traffic they were driving from Google recently).

The sites ranged from 89M clicks to 1.4M clicks over the past three months and spanned a number of verticals:

  • Site 1: 89M clicks
  • Site 2: 31M clicks
  • Site 3: 8.6M clicks
  • Site 4: 4.8M clicks
  • Site 5: 3.8m clicks
  • Site 6: 3.4M clicks
  • Site 7: 2.8M clicks
  • Site 8: 1.4M clicks

The GSC Void: Dark, Murky, and Inconclusive
First, the reality of filtered GSC data hit hard after exporting data based on query. Barry Schwartz covered this in July of 2022 after Patrick Stox wrote a post explaining what he was seeing across sites with GSC filtering data. It was eye-opening to see how much data was filtered for some sites…

When I checked at the time across sites, I also saw massive gaps in data when exporting based on query. For example, the total at the top of the Performance report in GSC can be much greater than what you see after exporting the data by query (and then totaling the clicks and impressions). And I mean WAY OFF. For some sites I analyzed at the time, I was only seeing 20% of the total after exporting the data. Yes, that means 80% of the data was filtered.

The reason is that Google filters queries based on privacy concerns. In its documentation, which it refined after Patrick’s study, Google explains that it filters “anonymized queries” to protect the privacy of users. And for some sites, it can be a ton of data. It’s worth noting that exporting by page will yield the full results (or close), but exporting by query highlights what I call the GSC void.

Back to continuous scroll data… For the twelve sites I analyzed, some GSC properties only provided 20-30% of the total data reported in the Performance reporting due to filtering. You read that correctly. That means 70-80% was filtered for those sites.

On the flip side, I’ve seen as high as 84% of the data showing (so 16% filtered), but that was the most I could find based on reviewing a number of properties in GSC. Don’t get me wrong, that’s much better than 24%!

When I saw the amount of filtering, I knew I had my work cut out for me with trying to analyze the data. I was hoping there was enough to see changes based on continuous scroll rolling out… One thing was clear, the GSC void was dark and murky.

Dark and Murky: Analyzing the impact to impressions, clicks, and click through rate.
First, “Dark and Murky” isn’t the name of a trendy new drink you can order poolside at a resort. It’s just the first thing I said after going through the data across the sites I analyzed. When I got past the first page of results, the numbers across most of the sites plummet. They drop so much that it’s nearly impossible to draw any conclusions about how continuous scroll is impacting clicks and click through rate from the desktop SERPs.

And from an impressions standpoint, I couldn’t see a consistent trend with the increase in impressions. For some queries, impressions did increase. For others, they dropped. And again, clicks and click through rate were very hard to analyze due to the insanely low numbers beyond page one.

For example, as soon as I checked the spreadsheet for page two results across several of the sites, the number of clicks was inconsequential. That shows you how much data is being filtered, by the way… On page one, some queries are yielding tens of thousands of clicks, or more. Then page two drops to almost nothing? So yes, the GSC void is real and it can severely hamper your analysis.

Here are some screenshots from the spreadsheets for page two of the search results. Get ready to be underwhelmed from a clicks standpoint. :)

But, I mentioned one site that only had 16% of its data filtered (which was the best I came across out the twelve). For that site, you would think I would have enough data to make some conclusions… but not really. Clicks were very low once I analyzed page two and beyond. I could see that impressions increased for a number of queries, but clicks didn’t. And since clicks were so low beyond page one, the difference in click through rate was pointless to review.

Here is a screenshot from the site that was only 14% filtered:

For example, for one query the number of impressions jumped by 3,110, but clicks only increased by 18. Average position went from 21.3 to 19.0, which is close, but that could have meant a jump from page three of the results to two. Clearly this isn’t enough data to draw any conclusions. The impressions increase is one thing, but the clicks were so low that it didn’t mean much. And to be honest, who really cares about an increase in impressions if clicks don’t follow. For most site owners, this isn’t really a branding exercise. They want the clicks and subsequent conversions! :)

Here’s another site where there was a nice increase in impressions for some queries, and definitely an increase in clicks for some of the queries. That said, some of the increases were due to the site ranking much stronger in the latest timeframe. There was an increase in impressions for some queries when the site ranked about the same position, but there’s just not enough click data to draw any serious conclusions…

Key takeaways based on analyzing Continuous Scroll in the desktop SERPs:

  • Based on my analysis across sites, there is NOT much data on page two and beyond to analyze… That’s even the case for large-scale sites with a ton of Google organic traffic. That’s based on GSC filtering anonymized queries.
  • I could see an increase in impressions for some queries, but I it was hard to draw any conclusions since there were many that dropped when comparing timeframes as well.
  • Clicks and click through rate were even harder to analyze. There weren’t many clicks to report overall beyond page one, which made it very tough to draw any conclusions.
  • From a GSC data standpoint, I had severely-limited data based on GSC filtering. This has been reported before, and this study underscored how much filtering is going on. For example, some of the exports were only yielding 20-30% of the data reported in GSC in the Performance reporting (when analyzing by query).
  • I do recommend going through this process for your own sites using the tutorial I published (if for no other reason than to see the severe filtering going on with GSC data when exporting by query). Note, you should be able to see the full data if exporting by page, but there are many queries that lead to specific pages (which can muddy waters analysis-wise).  

Summary: The GSC Void Limits Analysis of Continuous Scroll in the SERPs
After continuous scroll rolled out in the desktop search results, I was extremely excited to analyze the impact to impressions and clicks based on users scrolling to page two and beyond. Unfortunately, GSC data filtering hampered my efforts big-time. Some sites were only returning 20-30% of the total data based on GSC’s filtering of anonymized queries.

I’ll be sure to update this post if I come across stronger findings based on analyzing continuous scroll across sites. In the meantime, I do recommend going through this process for your own sites. You never know, GSC might not be filtering as much of your data… Good luck.

GG

The post Continuous Scroll And The GSC Void: Did The Launch Of Continuous Scroll In Google’s Desktop Search Results Impact Impressions And Clicks? [Study] first appeared on The Internet Marketing Driver.

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